We’re not writers who learned about finance.

We’re finance people who learned how to write.

The Team

Tim Purcell

Tim Purcell

Co-Founder

Previously:

    • Head of Corporate Development & Strategy at Real Vision
    • Corporate Development / Media M&A at AT&T
    • IMD at Goldman Sachs

    M.B.A. – University of Southern California

“I sold my sizeable VIX position on February 25 2020, missing a 280% rally in less than a month… so yeah, I live with that level of pain on a daily basis.”

Diego Tremiterra

Diego Tremiterra

Co-Founder

Previously:

    • Strategic Business Development at Real Vision
    • CFO / COO at Sonder People
    • Equity Sales at Goldman Sachs

    BSc – Nova School of Business & Economics

“Currently have the highest annualized return on investment of the team. Tim says: It’s an $80 dollar position on BTC and you’ve been doing this for less than a year, so it means nothing. But Tim also sold the VIX on Feb 25 2020…”

Roger Hirst

Roger Hirst

Senior Editor, Macro

Previously:

    • Macro Hedge Fund Sales at Goldman Sachs, Deutsche Bank, and UBS
    • European Equities at Morgan Stanley
    • Equity Derivatives Product Development at London Financial Futures Exchange

    MSc – University of Oxford

“When you read about inflationary bottlenecks in Edition I, make sure you read it in my British accent, it’ll be less confusing that way.” 

Why We Started The Lykeion

The hardest thing about finance is getting some sense of clarity amid such abundance of information. It’s hard to understand the relationships of causality through a daily diet of financial media, which often leads us to a FOMO-driven information overload that we’re unable to digest. This frequently is a result of the misalignment between what we think the role of financial media is and what its business model actually is.

Similarly to a waiter in a restaurant whose role is to assess the customers’ wants and bring the food to their table, Financial Media assesses what its audience wants, and reports information related to those preferences. Helping you digest the food (or the news) and ensuring that you correctly absorb the important nutrients (or information) doesn’t fall under the mandate of the waiter (or financial media). The only thing they can do to prevent indigestion is ensuring quality ingredients (or journalists), but that’s about it.

The mission at The Lykeion is not to replace, but to modestly complement Financial Media by helping you with the digestion process. We want to focus on developing your knowledge-based critical thinking, in order to help you reach clarity in a more efficient and less frustrating way.

We believe if you want to understand real world financial and economic developments, it’s not enough to have information on what the S&P 500 did last week, track unemployment rates and read oil inventory reports. That information, without some proper context and thought, will end up being just that – information.

What we’re interested in, instead, is helping you shape that information into understanding. Because understanding gives you the freedom to comprehend, contextualize and ultimately judge information. We want to help you develop how you think, and not tell you what to think.

The Origin Of The Name

The name of our publication is not easy to pronounce, we know that. It bears the name of a gymnasium in Greece, which we (sadly) have yet to visit.

Despite that incongruence, the Lykeion was an important Hellenic cultural forum that focused on promoting clarity of thought. Philosophers like Aristotle even rented some rooms in that gymnasium to establish a “Peripatetic” school, due to his habit of lecturing whilst in movement.

Similarly to him, but unfortunately with much less talent, we write to our audience whilst we move around the world, and aspire to share balanced views in the hope of promoting clarity of thought.

So, why the Lykeion, you ask us? Part of it was the romanticism of the meaning behind that name. You can never go wrong with Greek philosophers. Realistically though, it was mainly because our alternative domains were already taken and the owners were asking extortion level prices for them… Sure, we’re idealists, but only to a point. Then we become pragmatists.

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